As I said last week, I had been kicking around the idea for this blog roundup series for quite some time now but hadn’t made up my mind to commit to it. I have to say though, with the amazing response to week one, I am so glad I went ahead and started. We’ve come a long way with perceptions about women and personal finance, but we still have so, so far to go. Perhaps this Wednesday post will do a little bit more to have people reading women’s blogs when they read about personal finance. It’s slow going, but perceptions are changing, and I’m humbled to be a part of that change.

I was a little – okay, a lot – concerned about the extra time this post would take to pull together, but the articles out this past week have completely knocked it out of the park, and again I found myself itching for Wednesday so I could share them with you all here. The hardest part was narrowing them down to just three.

Women’s Personal Finance Wednesdays – Week 2

1. Not Always Either/Or. Sometimes It’s Both. FIREd up about Finance

I talk about this off and on quite a bit, and I love the phrase “personal finance is personal.” I feel like too often the personal finance space (and ESPECIALLY the FIRE community) can be very dogmatic in their thinking, though things are rarely black and white. Like JP says, even cable doesn’t have to be an absolute no (though it is for our family). Do what works for YOU, whether or not someone online says it’s the right thing to do.

2. The Power Of Words – And Women At Work Chief Mom Officer

As someone in a very male dominated field, I often find myself to be the only woman in the room, or at least one of the vast minority. Liz nails it with this one about how powerful words can be, and how ingrained stereotypes still are at work.

Personal experience for me just a few weeks ago: in a meeting I was chairing, a man walked in late, noticed he was just one of two (compared to six women), and the first thing out of his mouth was “we need some more testosterone in here.” If it was six men and two women, which is actually decent odds compared to many of my meetings, he wouldn’t have even noticed. I did call him out for the comment, but we have a loooong way yet to go.

3. When does self-care become self-sabotage? Champagne and Capital Gains

There is so much truth to this post. It is so easy to just let yourself overindulge in every part of your life in the name of “self care,” be it a chocolate cake, a bottle of wine, or a fancy new pair of shoes. Sometimes, though, self care is doing the hard things, but that doesn’t make a pretty Instagram quote.

I hope you enjoy the posts this week as much as I did. I read a ton of content and it was hard to narrow down my favorites. I’m looking forward to sharing some new ones with you again next week!

As always, if you’re looking for a categorized list of self identified women writing and speaking about personal finance, here is my comprehensive guide to the Women of the Finance Independence Community.

18 thoughts on “Women’s Personal Finance Wednesdays: Week 2 Roundup

  1. These are all awesome! I love the first one- totally up my alley that some things are important to some people and not others, and that’s ok. Thanks for doing this roundup (and for including me this week!) 🙂

    1. Exactly why there can never be too many voices in this space – everyone has a different perspective to bring to the table 🙂

  2. This weekly round up is fabulous! Thanks for sharing. I’ll be check out your full list of women in personal finance blogs too as I’m starting my long delayed blog journey. Thanks again 👍

  3. Love this post! I’ll be following to check out your weekly round up of women in personal finance and checking out your list too. Fantastic idea and a strong passion of mine. Thank you

  4. I’m behind on my blog reading (thanks, W2 job) and have only had a chance to read the second article but what a great idea for a series! Thank you!

    1. Hopefully it helps get you a short list to read for the week at least!

      Ps. Less than a month now!!

    1. Hmmm… not sure I did it effectively, though I’m not sure there was anything I could have said to change his perspective. My comments really were for everyone else in the room – basically that I generally am in meetings full of men and it was his turn 😉

  5. Thank you for sharing this wonderful post. I also do believe that personal finance is very much personal and different tricks work for different people. You have share some really awesome tips. Will keep forward to get some more.

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